Police Chief Urges 1-Day Suspension For White Cop Who Kicked Handcuffed Black Man’s Head

An Ohio police chief has recommended a 24-hour suspension for a white officer accused of kicking a handcuffed black man in the head ― a burst of violence an internal review called “unreasonable.”

Columbus Police Chief Kim Jacobs wrote in a June 14 memo to the city public safety director that Officer Zachary Rosen should serve the disciplinary period over the course of three work days, The Columbus Dispatch reported Wednesday.

The police department wouldn’t elaborate on Jacobs’ recommendation.

“It’s an ongoing discipline case and we won’t be able to comment,” Sgt. Rich Weiner told HuffPost.

Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther said no decision on discipline for the officer has been made. 

“While the Chief of Police has made a recommendation for discipline in the use of force case involving Officer Rosen, the Director of Public Safety will make the final decision under the current FOP contract,” Ginther said in a Wednesday Facebook post. “I have every expectation the Public Safety Director will discipline Officer Rosen in a manner that holds him accountable for his actions, and I expect the final decision to be made as quickly as possible.”

Rosen became a lightning rod of controversy after witnesses shared cellphone video of the April 8 incident on social media. The video shows an officer restraining 26-year-old Demarko Anderson when Rosen walks up and kicks the suspect in the head.

Anderson, who appeared to be complying with the officers, was found in possession of drugs and a firearm, police said.

The video garnered national attention and drew protesters to the city. Rosen was taken off patrol.

Columbus police in May said an internal review showed Rosen’s actions appeared to be “outside of policy” and “unreasonable.”

“If the fear of a weapon and the threat of death were real, it makes no sense that Officer Rosen stood around after the apprehension and did not search Mr. Anderson for weapons,” Deputy Chief Thomas Quinlan wrote in an investigative report, according to The Columbus Dispatch.

“If the fear of a weapon and the threat of death were real, it makes no sense that Officer Rosen stood around after the apprehension and did not search Mr. Anderson for weapons.” Deputy Chief Thomas Quinlan

The incident happened less than a month after a grand jury declined to indict Rosen and another officer in the unrelated shooting death of 23-year-old Henry Green.

Authorities said Rosen and the other officer spotted Green, who was black, walking down the street with a firearm last summer. Green ignored commands to drop the gun and fired on the officers, police said. The cops shot Green seven times, killing him.

WOSU Radio reported the police department’s firearms review board is still reviewing the shooting of Green. That probe could take up to eight months.

 

David Lohr covers crime and missing persons. Tips? Feedback? Send an email or follow him on Twitter. 

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